A vibrant street art scene in Zagreb replaces urban decay

A vibrant street art scene in Zagreb replaces urban decay

Street art is not only one of the most straight-forward examples of the expression of creativity in cities, but also fosters creativity and appeals to modern citizens as well as it encourages others to follow bold ways. Street art has been a great response to replace the urban decay in Zagreb and to make the city even more lively and vibrant.

Graffiti on a car parking closed to the main train station of Zagreb
Graffiti in a car parking closed to the train station of Zagreb

Shops and businesses advertise in the form of beautiful graffitis. Zagreb street art scene awakens to take over the still remaining decay of buildings and streets.

Graffiti Barbershop in Zagreb
Graffiti Barbershop in Zagreb

However, street art has also been most controversial among city officials; quite often put on a level with vandalism. Some city administrations enforce strict regulation to penalise artists for “illustrating their urban environments” while spending big amounts of money on cleaning up the city from street art.

Like the controversy around a 30-meter long Gulliver artwork by the artists Boris Bare and Dominik Vuković that is resting on the wall in Opatovina Park, tied by the petty Lilliputians.

Gulliver in Opatovina Park (Zagreb) by artists Boris Bare and Dominik Vuković
Gulliver in Opatovina Park (Zagreb) by artists Boris Bare and Dominik Vuković

I wonder whether it is the ‘visual pollution’ that triggers off those reactions by city officials, or rather the problems behind the messages that those murals express.

Art, in general, is supposed to open our minds. Art also tends to make us question conventions, even the establishment. Street art is not confined to galleries and museums; it reaches a big crowd and allows everybody to let creativity fly.

According to 100 Resilient Cities the ability of street art to appeal to oppositional elements and underserved populations endows it with the power to communicate, build greater community cohesion, facilitate post-disaster recovery, and help a city become more resilient.

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